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Institutional Members

Private Enterprise Federation (PEF)

The PEF was founded on the initiative of four major business associations namely, Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), Ghana National Chamber of Commerce, Ghana Employers Association (GEA) and the Federation of Associations of Ghanaian Exporters (FAGE). These business associations felt the need to come together to exert greater influence on policy initiatives for the creation of enabling environment in which private sector businesses could thrive as partners in economic development of the country.

 

PEF is a non-profit making, non-political, autonomous institution, incorporated on January 24, 1994, as a Company Limited by guarantee under the Ghana Companies Code, Act 179 with AGI, GNCC, GEA and FAGE as the founding members. Membership is open to the private business and trade associations.

 

The PEF was founded on the initiative of four major business associations namely, Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), Ghana National Chamber of Commerce, Ghana Employers Association (GEA) and the Federation of Associations of Ghanaian Exporters (FAGE). These business associations felt the need to come together to exert greater influence on policy initiatives for the creation of enabling environment in which private sector businesses could thrive as partners in economic development of the country.

 

PEF is a non-profit making, non-political, autonomous institution, incorporated on January 24, 1994, as a Company Limited by guarantee under the Ghana Companies Code, Act 179 with AGI, GNCC, GEA and FAGE as the founding members. Membership is open to the private business and trade associations

Ghana Audit Service (GAS)

The Service is headed by the Auditor General who is mandated to audit the public accounts of Ghana and all public offices including Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies, Public Corporations and Organisations established by an Act of Parliament and report the findings to Parliament. Audit Service is therefore the monitoring and accountability organ of the state, and the Supreme Audit Institution (SAI) of Ghana.

The 1969 Constitution made it an oversight body to promote good governance, ensure accountability and transparency in the Public Sector and Article 187 (2) of the 1992 Constitution reaffirms this position. Thus, Audit Service is the only institution mandated by the Constitution to monitor the use and management of all public funds and report to Parliament.

Public Procurement Authority (PPA),

The Authority seeks to ensure fairness, transparency and non-discrimination in public procurement in order to promote a competitive local industry and increase the confidence of our varied stakeholders in public procurement processes in the country and beyond.

Good Governance Africa (GGA)

GGA engages in applied research and stimulates critical debate. All our work is based on exploring and advancing the key governance principles of democracy, accountability and transparency, and combining these with upholding the rule of law and respecting human, civil and property rights.

Commonwealth Human Right Initiative (CHRI)

Ghana Conference of Religions for Peace (GCRP)

 The Ghana Conference of Religions for Peace (GCRP) has been in existence since 1981 to advocate on socio-political issues. The organisation is made up by a five member body of associations namely:

 

  1. Christian Council of Ghana
  2. Ahamadiya Muslim Mission
  3. Federation of Muslim Councils of Ghana
  4. National Catholic Secretariat
  5. Ghana Pentecostal Council

Ghana Integrity Initiative (GII)

Ghana Integrity Initiative, the local chapter of TI, was inaugurated in December 1999. GII is a non-partisan, not-for-profit civil empowerment organisation focused on the delivery of the essential themes necessary for the creation of a national integrity system.

 

The GII seeks to encourage networking among Community Based Organisations (CBOs) and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in the demand for open government as follows:

 

  • Support the evolution of strong institutions of governance especially the institutions directly involved in anti-corruption activity
  • Educate the public about civic rights and duties especially the basis of constitutionalism
  • Press for legislative reform of anti-corruption rules, enforcement procedures and rules for free media
  • Liaise with international anti-corruption bodies
  • Forge links between the public and government as a basis for the evolution of National Integrity System
  • Create and administer training programmes in ethics and civic duty

Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ)

The Parliament of the Republic of Ghana in accordance with the provisions of the Fourth Republican Constitution in October 1993 enacted the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice Act (Act 456), to establish the Commission.

 

The commission seeks to foster a culture of respect for fundamental human rights and freedoms, as well as administrative justice and fairness in Ghanaian society. The commission also exist to promote integrity and decency in Ghanaian public life by investigating corruption and educating the public about its high costs and, conversely, the significant pay-offs of a relatively corrupt free society.

 

Section 7(10)(a)-(h) of the Commission’s enabling statute Act 456 spells out the functions of the Commission as follows:

 

  1. Investigate complaints of violations of fundamental rights and freedoms, injustice, corruption, abuse of power and unfair treatment of any person by public officer in the exercise of his official duties;
  2. Investigate complaints concerning the functioning of the Public Services Commission, the administrative Organs of the State, the Armed Forces, the Police Service in so far as complaints relate to the failure to achieve a balanced structuring of those services or equal access by all to the recruitment of those services or fair administration in relation to those services;
  3. Investigate complaints concerning practices and actions by persons, private enterprises and other institutions where those complaints allege violations of fundamental rights and freedoms under this constitution;
  4. Investigate allegations that a public officer has contravened or has not complied with a provision of the Code of Conduct for Public Officers. The Code requires that public officers shall
  5. Declare their assets and liabilities on assumption of office, every four years, and on leaving office;
  6. Investigate all instances of alleged or suspected corruption and the misappropriation of public moneys by officials and to take appropriate steps, including reports to the Attorney-General and the Auditor General, results from such investigations;
  7. Educate the public as to human rights and freedom by such means as the Commissioner may decide, including publications, lectures and symposia;
  8. Investigate confiscation of property made by the two previous military regimes, the Armed forces Revolutionary Council and the Provisional National Defence;
  9. Report annually to Parliament on the performance of its functions.

Ghana Journalists Association (GJA)

The Ghana Journalists Association, founded in August 1949, has grown over the years to become the umbrella organisation representing Ghanaian journalists. It currently has membership of over a thousand (1,000), comprising practicing journalists and those in journalism-related fields. These include press officers and public relation officers who are classified as affiliate members.

 

The GJA is registered as a professional association recognised by Ghana’s constitution which lists it as one of the several bodies that make up the National Media Commission (NMC). The Commission was created to insulate the state-owned media from governmental control and promote press freedom and maintain high journalistic standards. The GJA seeks to influence positively the growth of the media by expanding the frontiers of press freedom and enhancing the integrity of professional journalism in Ghana.

 

As a member of the coalition, the GJA is able to take the advantage of the platform that is provided it as a professional body to carry out a planned and sustained fight against corruption jointly with other groups in society. The association has committed itself to impressing on their members to publicise the activities of GACC.

Economic and Organized Crime Office (EOCO)

The Economic and Organized Crime Office (EOCO) was set up by Act 804 of 2010 in line with Article 190 (1((d) of the 1992 constitution as one of the Public Services of Ghana to supplement and augment government's effort in the fight against corruption in the State. The Office was established as a specialized agency of government to monitor investigate and on the authority of the Attorney-General, prosecute any offence involving serious financial and economic loss to the state and to make provision for connected and incidental purposes.

 

The mandate of the Office is clearly set out by the EOCO Act. The relevant provisions, at Section 3(1) (a), (b), (c), (d) and (2) S. 12, and S. 13 indicate clearly that the mandate to investigate any suspected fraud is inherent in the Office and can be activated by the Executive Director without reference to any other authority or agency of State.

Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA)

The IEA is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental and politically non-partisan public policy think-tank was founded in 1989 with a view to broadening the debate on public policy, endangering private sector-led economic growth and strengthening the pillars of democracy.

 

The ultimate mission of the IEA is to promote good governance, democracy and a free and fair market economy in Ghana and Africa as a whole.

 

The IEA believes that the creation of an environment in which economic, social, political and legal institutions function openly and freely, is key to the attainment of sustainable economic growth and human development.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

  • To serve as a centre for policy analysis and public education
  • To provide a forum/platform for the exchange of ideas
  • To promote research and publication on important economic, socio-political and legal issues so as to enhance the understanding of public policy.
  • To strengthen local capacity in Ghana by providing training to institutions such as Parliament, the Judiciary, the media and Civil Society, thereby enhancing their oversight capabilities and enabling them to perform their roles as watchdogs of the society.
  • To promote economic reasoning and understanding of a world of scarcity and trade-offs.
  • To monitor and provide an in-depth analysis of the progress toward democratic consolidation in Ghana and in the West African sub-region.
  • To translate academic research and analysis on selected policy issues into available and readable information and make recommendations for the attention of policy makers

 

In a nutshell, the Institute of Economic Analysis is simultaneously

 

  • A centre for policy analysis
  • A forum for exchange of ideas
  • A resource centre for public education

 

As part of its efforts to achieve good governance and the entrenchment of multi-party democracy, IEA carries out periodic assessments of the quality of governance, and the performance of parliament

Centre for Democratic Development, Ghana (CDD)

The Centre is an independent, non-partisan and non-profit organisation based in Accra, Ghana. It is dedicated to the promotion of society and government based on the rule of law, appropriate checks on the powers of the state, and integrity in public administration. The CDD’s specific objectives include:

 

  • The promotion of transparency, accountability and integrity in the exercise of administrative and political discretion, and in the allocation and use of public resources
  • The promotion of access to information and data relating to matters of public interest, 
  • The provision of support, including training to agencies of democratic governance and civil society; defend the operational autonomy and help strengthen the oversight capabilities of public and private watchdog institutions.

 

In pursuit of its integrity promotion and corruption control objectives, the centre has undertaken the following programmes and activities among others:

 

  • Undertook the “Ghana Governance and Corruption survey: Evidence from Household, Pubic Officials and Business Enterprises”, April-August 2000. the study was sponsored by the world Bank following a competitive bidding process
  • Conducted a nationwide survey on public perceptions of corruption in the delivery of education and health care services in Ghana.

 

The Centre served as the local contact for the Secretariat of Transparency International (Berlin) and coordinated activities leading to the formation of the Ghana Integrity Initiative, a national chapter for TI.

National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE)

THE FUNCTIONS OF THE NCCE ARE TO:

1.     Create and sustain within the society the awareness of the principles and objectives of the 1992 fourth Republican Constitution as the fundamental law of the people of Ghana;

2.     Educate and encourage the public to defend the Constitution at all times, against all forms of abuse and violation;

3.     Formulate for the consideration of Government, from time to time, programmes at the national, regional and district levels aimed at realising the objectives of the 1992 fourth Republican Constitution;

4.     Formulate, implement and oversee programmes intended to inculcate in the citizens of Ghana awareness of their civic responsibilities and an appreciation of their rights and obligations as free people; and

5.     To assess for the information of Government, the limitations to the achievement of true democracy arising from the existing inequalities between different strata of the population and make recommendations for re-dressing these inequalities.

OUR STRUCTURE

The Commission is made up of a Chairman, two Deputy Chairman and four Commission members. The seven Commission members constitute the governing body of the Commission. The Commission members are supported by five (5) Departmental Directors who have direct responsibility for the departments of the Commission, namely:

1.     Finance

2.     Administration

3.     Programmes

4.     Communications and Corporate Affairs

5.     Research (with Gender and Equality unit

OUR PRESENCE

The Commission has ten (10) Regional Offices headed by Regional Directors who coordinate the Commission’s work in our Regional and District offices across the country

 

 

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